USA Fast Fact of the Day

1925 The New Yorker magazine is first published.

The New Yorker is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. It is published by Condé Nast. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans.

Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker has a wide audience outside of New York. It is well known for its illustrated and often topical covers, its commentaries on popular culture and eccentric Americana, its attention to modern fiction by the inclusion of short stories and literary reviews, its rigorous fact checking and copyediting, its journalism on politics and social issues, and its single-panel cartoons sprinkled throughout each issue.

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USA Fast Fact of the Day

What is the most populated city in the US?

New York, NY with a population of approximately 8,244,910.

USA Fast Fact of the Day

  • The first American chess tournament was held in New York in 1843.
  • The 641 mile transportation network known as the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway is the longest toll road in the United States.
  • A brewer named Matthew Vassar founded Vassar College in Poughkeepsie in 1861.
  • In 1979 Vassar students were the first from a private college to be granted permission to study in the People’s Republic of China.
  • The Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan is the only school in the world offering a Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing.
  • Union College in Schenectady is regarded as the Mother of  Fraternities because Delta Phi is the oldest continually operating fraternity and Kappa Alpha and Sigma Phi Societies were started on the campus.
  • The Woodstock Music and Arts Fair was actually held in Bethel.
  • Dairying is New York’s most important farming activity with over 18,000 cattle and or calves farms.
  • In 1807 The Clermont made its maiden voyage from New York City to Albany making the vessel the first successful steamboat.
  • Sam Schapiro began the Kosher wine industry on New York’s Lower East side with their famous extra heavy original concord wine in 1899.
  • New York City has 722 miles of subway track.
  • Power Mill Park situated outside Rochester has a house on Park Road shaped like a group of mushrooms.
  • Chittenago is the home of L. Frank Baum, author of the “Wizard of Oz”. It features a yellow brick inlaid sidewalks leading to Aunti Em’s and other Oz-themed businesses. Chittenago is the location of an annual Munchkins parade.
  • Oneida has the world’s smallest church with the dimensions of 3.5′ X  6′.
  • The first daily Yiddish newspaper appeared in 1885 in New York City.
  • The first international sports hero, boxer Bill Richmond of Staten Island, was born August 5, 1763.
  • The “New York Post” established in 1803 by Alexander Hamilton is the oldest running newspaper in the United States.
  • John Babcock invented both the indoor rowing machine and the sliding seat during the winter of 1869/1870.
  • The first railroad in America ran a distance of 11 miles between Albany and Schenectady.
  • The first capital of the United States was New York City. In 1789 George Washington took his oath as president on the balcony at Federal Hall.
  • Hartsdale has a pet cemetery established in 1896 and containing 12,000 plots.
  • In November for Boy Scouts and in March for Girl Scouts the annual Urban Camp-Outs are hosted at the Empire State Building.
  • The Catskills are the home of the legend of Rip Van Winkle, brown trout and flycasting.
  • The first presentation of 3D films before a paying audience took place at Manhattan’s Astor Theater on June 10, 1915.
  • Sam Wilson, a meatpacker from Troy who’s caricature Uncle Sam came to personify the United States is buried at Troy’s Oakwood Cemetery. During the War of 1812, he stamped “U.S. Beef” on his products which soldiers interpreted the U.S. abbreviation as meaning Uncle Sam.
  • The Genesee River is one of the few rivers in the world that flows south to north.
  • Rochester is known as both the Flour City and the Flower City. The community is home to the first abolitionist group, bloomers, marshmallows, Jell-O, French’s Mustard, baby shoes, gold teeth and the mail chute.
  • Gennaro Lombardi opened the first United States pizzeria in 1895 in New York City.
  • On July 28, 1945 an Army Air Corps B-25 crashed into the Empire State Building at the 79th floor level.
  • New York’s largest lake in Oneida measures 79.8 square miles.
  • New York’s highest waterfall is the 215 foot Taughannock.
  • The Erie Canal, built across New York State in the 1820s, opened the Midwest to development and helped New York City become a worldwide trading center.
  • The first Boy’s Club was established in New York City in 1876.
  • European settlers who brought seeds to New York introduced apples in the 1600s.
  • The Big Apple is a term coined by musicians meaning to play the big time.
  • The first Eagle Scout was Arthur R. Eldred from Troop 1 in Oceanside. He was bestowed the honor in May 1912.
  • Ten Mile River Boy Scout Camp in Narrowsburg is the largest council owned camp in the country.
  • Joseph C. Gayetty of New York City invented toilet paper in 1857.
  • Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken Jr. played against each other in Rochester vs. Pawtucket Red Sox in the longest game in baseball history. The game went a total of 33 innings.
  • The oldest cattle ranch in the US was started in 1747 at Montauk on Long Island.
  • Adirondack Park is larger than Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Glacier, and Olympic Parks combined.
  • New York was the first state to require license plates on cars.
  • Niagara Reservation became the first state park in the United States.
  • Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site in Newburgh was the first publicly owned historic site.
  • New York State is home to 58 species of wild orchids.
  • New York has over 70,000 miles of rivers and streams.
  • The first public brewery in America was established by Peter Minuit at the Market (Marckvelt) field in lower Manhattan.
  • Mount Kisco’s landmark, a statue of Chief Kisco, was once an elaborate fountain for watering horses. The statue stands at the intersection of Routes 117 and 133. D.F. Gorham, a strong supporter of prohibition, presented it to Mount Kisco in 1907. The inscription on the base to the statue reads “God’s Only Beverage for Man and Beast.”
  • The name Canandaigua (pronounced Can-an-DAY-gwa) is derived from a Native American word meaning the chosen spot.
  • Horseheads is the first and only village in the United States dedicated to the service of the American military horse.

USA Fast Fact of the Day

Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is a 102-story skyscraper located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. It has a roof height of 1,250 feet (381 meters), and with its antenna spire included, it stands a total of 1,454 ft (443.2 m) high.[6] Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. It stood as the world’s tallest building for 40 years, from its completion in 1931 until construction of the World Trade Center‘s North Tower was completed in 1972. Following the September 11 attacks in 2001, the Empire State Building was again the tallest building in New York (although it was no longer the tallest in the US or the world). The Empire State Building was once again demoted to second-tallest building in New York on April 30, 2012, when the new One World Trade Center reached a greater height.[10] The Empire State Building is currently the third-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States (after the Willis Tower and Trump International Hotel and Tower, both in Chicago), and the 15th-tallest in the world (the tallest now is Burj Khalifa, located in Dubai). It is also the fourth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

The Empire State Building is generally thought of as an American cultural icon. It is designed in the distinctive Art Deco style and has been named as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The building and its street floor interior are designated landmarks of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and confirmed by the New York City Board of Estimate.[11] It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1986.[8][12][13] In 2007, it was ranked number one on the List of America’s Favorite Architecture according to the AIA.

The building is owned and managed by W&H Properties.[14] The Empire State Building is currently undergoing a $550 million renovation, with $120 million spent in an effort to transform the building into a more energy efficient and eco-friendly structure.[15] Receiving a gold Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating in September 2011, the Empire State Building is the tallest LEED certified building in the United States.

Continue Reading @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empire_State_Building

USA Fast Fact of the Day

Times Square is a major commercial intersection in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue and stretching from West 42nd to West 47th Streets. Times Square – iconified as “The Crossroads of the World”[1][2][3][4][5] and the “The Great White Way[6][7][8] – is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway theater district,[9] one of the world’s busiest pedestrian intersections,[10] and a major center of the world’s entertainment industry.[11] According to Travel + Leisure magazine’s October 2011 survey, Times Square is the world’s most visited tourist attraction, bringing in over 39 million visitors annually.[12]

Formerly Longacre Square, Times Square was renamed in April 1904 after The New York Times moved its headquarters to the newly erected Times Building – now called One Times Square – site of the annual ball drop on New Year’s Eve.[13]

The northern triangle of Times Square is technically Duffy Square, dedicated in 1937 to Chaplain Francis P. Duffy of New York City’s “Fighting 69th” Infantry Regiment; a memorial to Duffy is located there, along with a statue of George M. Cohan, and the TKTS discount theatre tickets booth. The stepped red roof of the TKTS booth also provides seating for various events. The Duffy Statue and the square were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.

Continue Reading @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Times_Square

Classic Merican

Lunch Atop A Skyscraper

One of the most well-known photos of the 20th century, indeed an iconic image is “Lunch Atop A Skyscraper,” an image taken during the construction of the RCA Building (now the GE Building) at Rockefeller Center in 1932.  The building is also known as “30 Rock” as its address is 30 Rockefeller Center.  (I’m told that there is a sitcom by this name, but I’ve never seen it.)  The image was taken by Charles C. Ebbets and shows a number of steel workers sitting on a girder during their lunch break, apparently dangling hundreds of feet above the streets of New York.